FeaturesProgrammingVisual Studio Code 1.56 has been released with improvements for docker

The improved Docker support is part of the continuing work on VS Code's Remote Development extensions, which allow developers to use a container, remote machine, or the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) as a development environment.
15 May, 20216 min
Visual Studio Code

Visual Studio Code (VS Code) is Microsoft’s open source code editor, and despite the name has nothing to do with Visual Studio. Visual Studio Code 1.56 has been released with improvements including the ability to manage mounted volumes inside Docker containers. The release also handles clickable events better in the Workbench.

The improved Docker support is part of the continuing work on VS  Code’s Remote Development extensions, which allow developers to use a container, remote machine, or the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) as a development environment. This update adds a new volume view when the Clone Repository in Container Volume option is used. There’s also a new local terminal warning when a local terminal is launched within a remote window to help differentiate such terminals from true remote terminals.

If you have two editors that both state they should be your default editor for a resource (for example, an image viewer and an image editor), you will receive a prompt to resolve the conflict.

In the short video below, the user opens a PNG file, which is associated with two editors. The notification lets the user keep using the Luna Paint Image Editor or configure a new default, which they do and start using the binary Hex Editor.

Visual Studio Code 156 has been released with improvements for docker
Default custom editor and notebook resolution

The mouse hover feedback for actions has been improved across the Workbench to make it easier to find clickable editor actions.  Other improvements to the Workbench include a reminder to set a language in order to get full VS Code language support; Updated custom dialogs to provide better focus on the dialog; and the option to only auto update those extensions that are currently enabled.

Debugging is another area that has received improvements. The view of breakpoints has been made clearer to include the access type (read, write or access), and there’s better status and error reporting for exception breakpoints.  It’s also now possible to flip between launch and attach debug sessions to provide more options for stop and disconnect commands. Another enhancement updates the Call Stack column indicator every time a debugging session is stopped on a line to make it clearer where the program is currently stopped.

All-in-all these are a useful set of enhancements for an already highly usable IDE – that is once you get used to its sometimes strange ways of doing things.

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