Chrome to block HTTP downloads

Google Chrome will soon restrict certain files, like PDFs or executables, from being downloaded via an HTTP connection – even if they are loaded on HTTPS webpages. HTTPS indicates that a website has an encrypted connection. When connecting to an HTTP website, browsers merely look up the IP address and send data over to it in clear text. When using an HTTPS website, on the other hand, the browser checks that it has a legitimate SSL...

Securing the internet

Privacy and security has justified a cause to bring encryption to an internet which was built without a foundation for security with an aims to put an end to the unencrypted Internet. But the web has a chicken and egg problem moving to HTTPS. Long ago it was difficult, expensive, and slow to set up an HTTPS capable web site. Then along came services like CloudFlare’s Universal SSL that made switching from http:// to https://...

HTTP Cookies Are Evil – Get Rid of Them – Blink Team

The latest proposal to ban HTTP Cookies is from the development team of Blink, the layout engine at the core of Chrome. It may not come to anything, but it is another example of the browser makers attempting to set standards which suits them. Browser makers have a lot of power because what their creations do sets the defacto standard for the web. Forget W3C or WhatWG, if a browser maker opts to put something...

Chrome cracks down on sites that dont use encryption

A special warning will alert users when sites aren’t using HTTPS beginning in Chrome 56. Chrome is embarking on a crusade to crack down on websites that still aren’t using encryption, and it starts with the latest version of the browser, Chrome 56. Chrome 56 is launching in January, and will implement a new warning that you’ll see on any login sites that are still unencrypted. The pages will be marked as “not secure” in...