Science plus Python & WebAssembly Equals Pyodide

Science plus Python & WebAssembly Equals Pyodide

Based on Iodide, we now have Pyodide which allows a Python interpreter to run inside the browser and create living documents there, thus bringing data science to the browser. As we’ve seen in “Run VSCode in the browser“, portability is the new trend sought after. And with that we mean the ease of running everything inside the ubiquitous browser, be it an IDE, a game or an interpreter.  Pyodide is the Python offspring of Iodide, the attempt to bring Javascript and science to the browser. Iodide was already a success, but since Javascript had no well-defined scientific stack whereas Python does, the idea of replacing JavaScript with Python was suggested. And…

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VSCode can now run in the Browser

VSCode can now run in the Browser

Coder.com has open sourced its cloud-server component which allows VSCode to run on a remote server fully accessible through the browser.   What is the advantage of that? Code on your Chromebook, tablet, and laptop with a consistent dev environment. Take advantage of large cloud servers to speed up tests, compilations, downloads, and more. Preserve battery life when you’re on the go as all intensive computation runs on your server, plus you’re no longer running excess instances of Chrome. Code-server is available as a single binary or Docker image and can be self hosted locally, which of course beats the purpose of portability, or on remote servers such as a VPSs’ on…

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Open Source Visual Studio Code Without Trackers now available

Open Source Visual Studio Code Without Trackers now available

An open source version of Visual Studio Code that doesn’t pass telemetry data back to Microsoft has been released. VSCodium aims to offer a more private development experience to Visual Studio developers.  What worries some developers about Visual Studio Code is that it passes telemetry and tracking information back to Microsoft. This can be turned off in the Visual Studio Preferences Settings menu, but some developers in the past have objected that even when they did this, they saw situations where the telemetry servers used by Microsoft were still being contacted. Microsoft’s response was that this was to send the information that telemetry was disabled, but this still annoyed developers. Now…

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Switch Expressions comes with Java 12

Switch Expressions comes with Java 12

Java 12, the latest six-monthly release of Java, has been released with support for Switch Expressions and the inclusion of the Shenandoah low-pause garbage collector.  There are eight main improvements to the new release, starting with switch expressions. This is still a preview feature, and it extends the switch statement so that it can be used as either a statement or an expression. Whichever form is used, you can use either a traditional or a simplified scoping and control flow behavior. Oracle says that in addition to simplifying everyday coding, the addition prepares the way for the use of pattern matching in the switch statement. Pattern matching is available as another…

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IFTTT applets retired on Gmail from March 31

IFTTT applets retired on Gmail from March 31

Most of the integration of Gmail features in IFTTT are being removed on March 31. IFTTT apps will still be able to send an email, but will no longer be able to trigger actions based on emails received. Google is removing the means to carry out such actions as a side effect of its larger plans to tighten security. The overall plans were announced back in October when Google said it was reviewing all third party applications to see that they conform to stricter security settings. The changes were driven by concern that third-party apps could use Gmail’s APIs to gain access to the content and details of Gmail users’ emails.…

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Is Rust the low-level-ish

Is Rust the low-level-ish

Rust is the great hope for a safe low-level programming language. This is often expressed in the motto “fearless concurrency”, but who is to say that it really is better. Perhaps it’s just as bad in different ways. New research by Zeming Yu, Linhai Song, Yiying Zhang at Pennsylvania State University and Purdue University aims to find out if Rust’s approach to concurrency really does protect the programmer from making the sort of mistake so common in C-like languages. Rust is a language that all the cool kids are talking about, if not using. If you have missed its back story, it was invented in 2006 by Gradon Hoare, is championed…

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